Contemplation or activism?

The trial of Anders Behring Breivik has taught us quite a lot, including that meditation can be used for bad purposes.

Breivik testified that he used a combination of prayer and Bushido (Zen/Samurai) meditation to numb his mind to the fear of death, and presumably also the horror of taking life too.

His is a peculiar case, but by no means unique.

Breivik’s mistakes were manifold and terrible, but one of them was to convince himself that what was needed was action, and then to carry it out. Obviously his decision had terrible consequences.

On a smaller scale, activism always has problems. Activists are convinced that action must be taken, and then busily take it. This translates into all spheres of life, work, family, spirituality etc etc. And sometimes of course its right, the action is vital. The man who calmly watches his toddler stumble off a cliff can hardly be commended for his contemplative attitude.

But at the same time, we modern westerners have become somewhat over reliant on activism as a way of life – it is what gives us status and meaning in our culture.

We need to remember what the writer Henri Nouwen described as ‘the only necessary thing’ an attitude of spiritual contemplation. Nouwen takes his inspiration from the almost too good to be totally true story of Mary and Martha, the one sister, Mary, sits at the feet of her teacher, while the other, Martha, bustles around preparing food and washing the dishes. When Martha complains that her sister is not helping her, the guru explains that Mary has chosen to do the ‘one thing [that] is needed.’

Similarly the betrayal of Jesus is precipitated by a man whose name suggests that he might once have been a member of a knife wielding bunch of Jewish rebels, determined to drive the Romans from their land. When he felt Jesus wasn’t getting the job done, Judas Iscariot decided to tip his hand, with devastating results.

And there are many other examples of those who have chosen an activist path, over a contemplative one, to their detriment. They, we, fail to recall that the ‘only necessary thing’ is not to try and tip the hand of the divine, but to be in his presence.

As Julian of Norwich noted, ‘all shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.’

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5 thoughts on “Contemplation or activism?

  1. I think I’m both, I find taking time to listen to my conscience inspires my activism.

  2. I guess Judas may have been a sicarius, though personally I think his name singles him out as being from Judea, an archetypal Jew even, very much an outsider in Jesus’ otherwise pretty homogeneous group of Galileans.

  3. Malcolm Smith says:

    great post…right..let’s do something about it!! ;-)

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