Tag Archives: totally devoted the challenge of new monasticism

Totally Devoted – reviews

My book seems to be undergoing a small spike in sales, I wonder if that is to do with the review which I am told appears in Christianity magazine this month – and which declares (amongst other kind words):

If the Church is in ruins, then this book is part of the repair kit!

Which is kind of nice. And a little worrying. I mean, y’know – that’s a big responsibility!

Anyway, feel free to write your own review, but only if you are willing to say nice things – if you don’t like it, then shhhhh!

You can get the book here, here, here and indeed here. Apparently there may even be a bookshop or two with it in!

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community life – and my sunny weekend

I spent most of Friday and Saturday at the house of the Community of the Resurrection at Mirfield, near Leeds. It’s the second trip I’ve made there this year, and I enjoyed it even more than last time.

For one thing, this time I was joined by my friend James, who blogs here and tweets @n0rma1 – this was James’ first visit, and I was really encouraged to see how much kinship there is between his kind of new monasticism and the older monasticism/religious life that is to be found there.  It makes me think that my book was about right on that.

It’s great to see how links are forged between communities, and principally between individuals who represent different communities. It is sometimes only by making those face to face visits that we recognise the humanity in one another, and see past the preconceptions or societal stereotypes.

I also relished the opportunity to spend some time in quiet, and feel reinvigorated now, ready to dive into more preparations for meditation workshops, MBS fayre stuff, books, community projects and so on.

I was also encouraged by something I read in the Tablet, which was an article by Christopher Jamison in which he wrote about the way that so many people try to minister to those around them by inviting them to Mass – or to a general church service if you’re a protestant. What we are doing, points out Jamison, is adding another level of busyness to already overburdened lives – people genuinely have a lot to do. What we would be better doing is finding ways for people to experience peace in their everyday lives, rather than adding a new level of activity.

I agree with this – only this weekend I heard somebody talking about how we should be inviting people to church, by which this person meant a church service. For many of the people I know though, Sunday morning is about the only time of rest they get, going to church would put the kiebosh on that too. I’m much more interested in finding ways to help people create oases of peace in the everyday, to experience the justice, peace and joy which we talk about often, but dont tend to generate in sunday morning meetings.

Dont get me wrong, I’m not trying to abolish church ‘services’ only trying to encourage us to make more of our ‘service’ to others, and not to limit church to congregational meetings.

People who have heard me talk recently about ‘post congregationl church’ will perhaps see what I mean here – our view of what it means to be church is too often stuck in a rut of ‘meeting attendees’ – lets make our church wider and broader, and turn our towns into temples.  (Also our villages, cities, estates etc, just that towns and temples scan nicely.)

It was so good to spend time at the monastery this weekend, I can thoroughly reccomend it as a great place to visit – especially when the weather is good, as the garden is glorious.

One of the brothers there also mentioned this piece from the guardian by Toby Jones, a lovely chap whose own community is a great example of what it might mean to create something along kind of new monastic lines. His column in the observer is now over, but it makes great re-reading, and you can look back through it to see just what sort of journey Toby and his family have been on recently.

In our case of course, the reality is somewhat less glamorous. We’re yet to see whether we will stay here beyond the summer, or whether there will be pastures new on the horizon. The house we want to move into here hasnt yet become available – although we’re still hoping. But even if it does, there’s no saying what rental price tag it will come with. Presumably somewhat more than our current abode.

We’re also really in need of more people to work alongside us – ours is a new monastic vocation really, and if you’re calling is partly to prayer, partly to study, and partly to service – then you’re in the same groove as us – so why not get in touch.

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Did you believe in Jebus?

It was great to meet some wonderful people over the weekend, many of whome came along to my seminar about Jebus. Because of the interesting way the conference is structured I repeated the seminar three times, and each time we had a great crowd and a whole different set of discussions. Topics covered included: the rights and wrongs of voluntary poverty, why it should be harder to become a Christian, why we should or shouldnt give up on the established church, and a whole lot more. Very good stuff indeed.

I even managed to sell all the books I took with me, which just about covered my own conference fee! Marvellous.I also sold some CD’s of recorded scripture readings which are to be used in meditation. These are part of a new venture I am working on called Emmaus Encounters, I’ve started building a website here. It will be finished sometime before too long.

I had to laugh when someone asked if ‘as a speaker’ I was in a nice, ensuite room – just goes to show how little they understood about our movement. We dont really distinguish between speakers and cleaners (not that I was a speaker in any case) we all pay the same, we all get the same, whether we’re going to speak, to make the coffee, or to listen. There’s a rightness in that.

That said, I was fortunate enough to get a room to myself, not because of my exalted (ha ha) status, but because the person I was to have shared with decided to bring his wife at the last minute. Just as well for him really as I was in bed late and up early every day. A good time was had by all I hope.

If I met you at the conference, then welcome to the blog – this is home to my ramblings, and perhaps some statements which are about as provocative as those I made in the seminars. I do like to get a bit of discussion going.

Some people asked me if the seminar material may form the basis of my next book, well that’s something I’m wondering about too. I’ll let you know.

If you’re here looking for ideas concerning exploring spirituality with young and/or unchurched people – then do have a nose around on the site, you may find some stuff, and also look out, I’ll be back soon with some links for you.

If you’re here because you’re considering inviting us to come and facilitate some kind of training, seminar or other such event – then please be advised I expect ensuite rooms and breakfast served by a butler! LOL.

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